Thursday, 1 June 2017

Disrupting bacteria to better treat infections


While scientists rush to discover new antibiotics, bacteria fight back by developing new tools to resist antibiotics. In recent years, the bacteria have been winning.

So this paradigm led researchers at NSU to take another look at how bacteria do what they do to see if there was another way to approach this issue. Researchers are now focusing on developing new ways to treat infections that reduce the use of antibiotics. And what the NSU researchers found, working with colleagues from Duke University and the University of Minnesota, was interesting.

One way that bacteria infect people is by working together. First, they build a home called a biofilm, and then use chemicals to "talk with each other." This allows the bacteria to coordinate an attack on the infected person. Led by NSU graduate Cortney Wilson, Smith's lab recently discovered that by shaking the house that the bacteria have built, the ability of the bacteria to talk to one another is affected. Wilson earned her Master's from NSU and is now at the University of Colorado, Boulder.

"We found that shaking the bacteria forced them to face a decision; do they want to grow, or do they want to cooperate," Smith said. "And if we shook them at just the right frequency, we created enough confusion that the bacteria could do neither effectively."

Smith notes that this strategy to prevent bacteria from talking to one another has promise in reducing the need for antibiotics. The team of scientists hope to begin testing their theory in more species of bacteria, and eventually in mice.

"It is a very exciting time for our research team. We are looking forward to building upon our very promising results and to moving our strategy into the clinic."

For further details see:

Cortney E. Wilson, Allison J. Lopatkin, Travis J. A. Craddock, William W. Driscoll, Omar Tonsi Eldakar, Jose V. Lopez, Robert P. Smith. Cooperation and competition shape ecological resistance during periodic spatial disturbance of engineered bacteria. Scientific Reports, 2017; 7 (1) DOI: 10.1038/s41598-017-00588-9

Posted by Dr. Tim Sandle