Tuesday, 29 January 2019

New method can quickly and accurately detect infections


Two chemistry researchers have developed a method that can show quickly and accurately whether a person has been infected with harmful bacteria or other pathogens. Additionally, this new method shows the exact severity of infection in a person.

A new study by Waldemar Gorski, professor and chair of the UTSA Department of Chemistry, and Stanton McHardy, associate professor of research in chemistry and director of the UTSA Center for Innovative Drug Discovery, describes a method that could show quickly and accurately whether a person has been infected with harmful bacteria or other pathogens. Additionally, this new method shows the exact severity of infection in a person.

The most common method of testing for infection in medical facilities is currently a strip that turns a certain color when infected fluids come into contact with it.

Gorski, seeing a need for an easier and more rapid method of testing for infection, resolved to test an electrochemical approach, and sought out McHardy, a medicinal chemist. Together, they created molecules that bind to leukocyte enzymes and produce an electrical current to signal the presence of an infection.

Their new molecules are housed on a testing strip. After being contacted with infected bodily fluids, the strip is connected to a computer monitor that displays a clear range of electrochemical responses demonstrating the severity of an infection.

See:

Douglas Hanson, Travis Menard, Teresa Blazek, Stanton McHardy, Waldemar Gorski. Synthesis and Characterization of Pyridine Compounds for Amperometric Measurements of Leukocyte Esterase. ChemBioChem, 2018; DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201800164
Posted by Dr. Tim Sandle, Pharmaceutical Microbiology

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