Friday, 17 May 2019

Tackling challenge of antifungal resistance


New work is helping develop a better understanding of the growing threat posed by antifungal drug resistance. Invasive aspergillosis is a devastating disease caused by breathing in small airborne spores of the fungus Aspergillus fumigatus and it is a condition where drug resistance has been encountered. They have just released a paper revealing how they have been able to identify a previously uncharacterized genetic mutation in clinical isolates that leads to resistance.

Invasive aspergillosis is a devastating disease caused by breathing in small airborne spores of the fungus Aspergillus fumigatus and it is a condition where drug resistance has been encountered.

In a healthy person these spores are destroyed by the body's immune system but in those with a weakened immune system -- such as following organ transplantation or in someone with a lung condition such as asthma or cystic fibrosis -- they can trigger a range of problems including infections.

READ MORE: Fungal spore 'death clouds' key in gypsy moth fight

Every year aspergillosis leads to more than 200,000 life-threatening infections and increasingly resistance to vital antifungal drug treatments makes those infections harder to treat.

National Institutes of Health (USA) funding supported a collaboration between the University of Tennessee, the University of Texas and Swansea University as part of a $2 million, five-year research programme. This support enabled investigation of resistance to the triazole class of antifungal drugs used for treating the disease

A new paper shows how researchers have been able to identify a previously uncharacterised genetic mutation in clinical isolates that leads to resistance.

Journal reference:

Jeffrey M. Rybak, Wenbo Ge, Nathan P. Wiederhold, Josie E. Parker, Steven L. Kelly, P. David Rogers, Jarrod R. Fortwendel. Mutations in hmg1, Challenging the Paradigm of Clinical Triazole Resistance in Aspergillus fumigatus. mBio, 2019; 10 (2) DOI: 10.1128/mBio.00437-19
Posted by Dr. Tim Sandle, Pharmaceutical Microbiology

No comments:

Post a Comment

Pharmaceutical Microbiology Resources

Special offers