Thursday, 16 April 2020

New approach to unraveling Clostridium difficile


Biologists at the University of California San Diego are drawing parallels from newly developed models of the common fruit fly to help lay the foundation for novel therapies to fight the pathogen's spread.

As with most bacterial pathogens, C. difficile secretes toxins that enter host cells, disrupt key signaling pathways and weaken the host's normal defense mechanisms. The most potent strains of C. difficile unleash a two-component toxin that triggers a string of complex cellular responses, culminating in the formation of long membrane protrusions that allow the bacteria to attach more effectively to host cells.

UC San Diego scientists created strains of fruit flies that are capable of expressing the active component of this toxin, known as "CDTa." The strains allowed them to study the elaborate mechanisms underlying CDTa toxicity in a live model system focused on the gut, which is key since the digestive system of these small flies is surprisingly similar to that of humans.


The fruit fly model gave the researchers a clear path to examine genetic interactions disrupted at the hands of CDTa. They ultimately found that the toxin induces a collapse of networks that are essential for nutrient absorption. As a result, the model flies' body weight, fecal output and overall lifespan were severely reduced, mimicking symptoms in human C. difficile-infected patients.

See:

Ruth Schwartz, Annabel Guichard, Nathalie C. Franc, Sitara Roy, Ethan Bier. A Drosophila Model for Clostridium difficile Toxin CDT Reveals Interactions with Multiple Effector Pathways. iScience, 2020; 100865 DOI: 10.1016/j.isci.2020.100865

Posted by Dr. Tim Sandle, Pharmaceutical Microbiology Resources (http://www.pharmamicroresources.com/)

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