Wednesday, 19 April 2017

Faster, more accurate detection of food- and water-borne bacteria


Recently, Charles S. Henry and colleagues developed a paper-based method to detect Salmonella, Listeria and E. coli in food and water samples. In their latest study, Henry's team wanted to see if it would be feasible to use this paper-based technique in conjunction with electrochemical analysis to produce more refined results.


To simulate contaminated food, the researchers exposed clean alfalfa sprouts to E.coli and Enterococcus faecalis bacteria. They also collected unfiltered water from a nearby lagoon. For colorimetric detection, the team built a simple light box, which served as a substitute for a laboratory plate reader. Then they used a smartphone to take a series of images of the 84 paper-based well plates over time. For the electrochemical portion of the experiment, they used a series of electrodes printed onto plastic transparency sheets. Both approaches used the same assays to successfully detect harmful bacteria in the samples within 4 to 12 hours, and both produced complementary findings. They conclude that combining their paper-based technique with electrochemistry could lead to a simpler, yet more comprehensive way to detect bacterial contaminants in food and water.

See:

Jaclyn A. Adkins, Katherine Boehle, Colin Friend, Briana Chamberlain, Bledar Bisha, Charles S. Henry. Colorimetric and Electrochemical Bacteria Detection Using Printed Paper- and Transparency-Based Analytic Devices. Analytical Chemistry, 2017; DOI: 10.1021/acs.analchem.6b05009

Posted by Dr. Tim Sandle