Sunday, 20 September 2020

Yeast strain makes fatigue-fighting ornithine



Researchers from the Nara Institute of Science and Technology and the Nara Prefecture Institute of Industrial Development have revealed that a mutant strain of sake yeast produces 10 times the amount of the amino acid ornithine compared with the parent yeast strain.

Ornithine is a non-protein-making amino acid and a precursor to two amino acids -- arginine and proline. It has been found to perform several physiological functions, such as reducing fatigue and improving sleep quality.

 

To find ethanol-tolerant yeast strains, the researchers isolated mutants that accumulated proline, which can alleviate ethanol toxicity, using a conventional mutagenesis (i.e., one that doesn't involve genetic modification). They also conducted whole genome sequencing analysis, and performed brewing tests with sake yeast strains. Then they identified and analyzed a new mutation in a gene that encodes a variant of N-acetyl glutamate kinase that increases intracellular ornithine level.

 

The results of this study will contribute to the development of improved yeast strains for production of high levels of ornithine, and the strain obtained in this study could be readily applied to sake, wine, and beer brewing. Ornithine-accumulating yeast strains could also be used in the production of ornithine-rich dietary supplements made from these yeasts and their products.

 

See:

 

Masataka Ohashi, Ryo Nasuno, Shota Isogai, Hiroshi Takagi. High-level production of ornithine by expression of the feedback inhibition-insensitive N-acetyl glutamate kinase in the sake yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Metabolic Engineering, 2020; 62: 1 DOI: 10.1016/j.ymben.2020.08.005

Posted by Dr. Tim Sandle, Pharmaceutical Microbiology Resources (http://www.pharmamicroresources.com/)

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