Monday, 14 July 2014

Enterobacteriaceae, Coliforms, and Escherichia Coli

The Enterobacteriaceae is a large family of Gram-negative bacteria that includes, along with many harmless symbionts, many of the more familiar pathogens, such as Salmonella, Escherichia coli, Yersinia pestis, Klebsiella, Shigella, Proteus, Enterobacter, Serratia, and Citrobacter. Members of the Enterobacteriaceae are rod shaped and typically are 1–5 mm in length. Enterobacteria have Gram-negative stains, and they are facultative anaerobes, fermenting sugars to produce lactic acid and various other end products. Many members of this family are a normal part of the gut flora found in the intestines of humans and other animals, whereas others are found in water or soil, or are parasites on a variety of different animals and plants.

This is the introduction to a chapter by Tim Sandle for the new edition of the Encyclopedia of Food Microbiology. The reference is:

Sandle, T., 2014. Biochemical and Modern Identification Techniques: Enterobacteriaceae, Coliforms, and Escherichia Coli. In: Batt, C.A., Tortorello, M.L. (Eds.), Encyclopedia of Food Microbiology, 2nd edition, vol 1. Elsevier Ltd, Academic Press, pp. 232–237

Written by the world's leading scientists and spanning over 400 articles in three volumes, the Encyclopedia of Food Microbiology, Second Edition is a complete, highly structured guide to current knowledge in the field. Fully revised and updated, this encyclopedia reflects the key advances in the field since the first edition was published in 1999

The articles in this key work, heavily illustrated and fully revised since the first edition in 1999, highlight advances in areas such as genomics and food safety to bring users up-to-date on microorganisms in foods. Topics such as DNA sequencing and E. coli are particularly well covered.


With lists of further reading to help users explore topics in depth, this resource will enrich scientists at every level in academia and industry, providing fundamental information as well as explaining state-of-the-art scientific discoveries.


To review a copy, please contact Tim Sandle.

Posted by Tim Sandle